Is Missguided a Fast Fashion Brand?

Screenshot of Missguided website

Yes, Missguided is a fast fashion brand.

Founded by British-Indian businessman Nitin Passi (worth £250 million), Missguided is an online-only fast fashion retailer. This includes its menswear brand, Mennace.

Missguided sells thousands of products on its site (at last count: 3866 dresses, 3249 tops, 1897 loungewear, and even 228 styles of jeans), with the dominant material in their range being polyester.

In terms of sustainability, Missguided has an one long corporate responsibility page outlining key steps they are taking around materials, employment laws, and the multiple initiatives that Missguided works with. Scrolling past a cringeworthy letter from Nitin (in which he says “We #DreamBig, look to #WinTogether, #BelieveAlways and #LoveLots”, which turns out to be Missguided’s #values), you can discover their ‘Ethical Objectives’. These openly state:

There shall be no new recruitment of children (below 15 years of age unless local law stipulates higher age in which case higher age shall apply)

…meaning Missguided’s clothes are made by 15 year old children in countries that permit this.

Other facepalm-inducing objectives include:

  • Missguided is ‘starting work on ‘closed loop recycling’ process for our packaging’ – so they don’t already use recyclable packaging, let alone consider fabric recycling, clothes recycling, take-back schemes, etc.
  • Under Recycled Materials: ‘As polyester accounts for a large proportion of our offer we believe that for Missguided recycled polyester is the most meaningful route to a more sustainable offer’. Recycled polyester isn’t great, why not move away from it altogether?
  • ‘MISSGUIDED is a fur free retailer and prohibits the use of fur in any product supplied to us for resale.’ – this was most likely implemented after real fur was found in Missguided’s line in 2017

Do I need to say anymore? Do better, Missguided.

Transparency Rating: N/A
Sustainability Rating: 2/5


This snippet is part of a larger guide to UK fast fashion brands, which goes into more detail about the issues with fast fashion, why it will never be sustainable, and how to make your wardrobe more sustainable.

Data for this review is taken from the brand’s website, corporate website, and Wikipedia. The Transparency Rating is from Fashion Transparency Index 2020. The Sustainability Rating is from Good On You.

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